Diabetes

Diabetes is expensive
Diabetes has an enormous economic impact on millions of individuals and their families, on workplaces, and on the U.S. health care system.
  • In 2017, the total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes was $327 billion ($237 billion in direct medical costs and $90 billion in lost productivity), up 26 percent over a five-year period.
  • About one in four health care dollars is spent on people with diagnosed diabetes.
  • Medical expenses for people diagnosed with diabetes — $16,750 annually on average — are about 2.3 times higher than for people without diabetes.
Don’t let the “pre” in prediabetes fool you — prediabetes is a serious health condition that can develop into even more serious health conditions. Take action now to help prevent prediabetes from becoming type 2 diabetes. If you find out you have prediabetes, ask your doctor to refer you to a CDC-recognized lifestyle change program. Through the program, you’ll take small, manageable steps that add up to lasting lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Find a program to get started today!
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Diabetes

Gaps in private insurance coverage are common among American adults with type 1 diabetes, raising their risk for health crises, a new study finds.

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Diabetes

You'd expect big blood sugar fluctuations in people with diabetes. But for those without the disorder, blood sugar levels should remain fairly stable, right?

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Diabetes

Using sulfonylurea drugs with or instead of metformin to control blood sugar increases type 2 diabetics' risk of serious complications, a new study finds.

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Diabetes

Could a vaccine from the early 1900s be the key to preventing serious diabetes complications? Maybe, say researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital.

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Diabetes

For many diabetics, one of the most dreaded aspects of managing their condition is the need to inject insulin multiple times a day. But Harvard researchers have discovered a way to deliver insulin in a pill, and it appears to work well -- at least in rats.

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Diabetes

Using an artificial pancreas can help hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes maintain good blood sugar control, a new study suggests.

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